Category Archives: naval

Review of “Churchill’s Last Wartime Secret: The 1943 German Raid Airbrushed from History” by Adrian Searle

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No hard evidence, but an interesting and well researched tale nonetheless.

Adrian Searle lives on the Isle of Wight and has written several history books. This book details the evidence he has compiled to validate the tale of a German raid on the Isle of Wight in 1943 to steal radar equipment.

The book gets into the evidence of the raid in the last two thirds with the first third detailing and debunking tales of other alleged German raids including the infamous Shingle Street story.

There’s also a chapter covering details of the British raid on Bruneval which again was to steal radar equipment and which bears some similarities to the alleged German raid.

Searle then goes onto to showcase his three key characters all of whom are unfortunately now deceased. The first two appear to be reputable characters, one a former war crimes investigator and local Isle of Wight historian and the second a German city senior archivist and apparent veteran of the raid. The third is a second hand source offered by a local military historian.

These combined with some archival evidence, such as an ARP report of “dingies full of Germans in the sea” put forward some scant flesh on the bones of what would result in a major re-write of British World War 2 history.

True or not, there’s shades of the early pages of Jack Higgins “The Eagle Has Landed” when Searle searches local cemeteries for evidence of British and possibly hidden German casualties.

I’ll leave you to decide, but you can’t deny Searle his diligence in his research and coming up with a rattling good tale that I for one would be delighted to be true.

I received this book free from Pen & Sword and was not required to write a positive review.

Review of “Pearl Harbor: From Infamy to Greatness” by Craig Nelson

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Fast flowing new account of the attack on Pearl Harbor

Craig Nelson provides an expansive book that tells the often told story of the Pearl Harbor attack. It’s been a while since I’ve read Prange’s standard on this subject “At Dawn We Slept” so I have little to compare, however I found this a comprehensive account with some interesting later chapters covering how some of the characters fared in later life and the modern day Japanese and American perspective.

Divided into three parts it’s a substantial read at 500 plus pages but does flow at quite a pace. Part one covers Japanese-U.S. relations, the growing tension in the Pacific, and Japanese war planning. Part two covers the attack itself including midget submarines. Part three covers the aftermath of the attacks, rescue efforts, salvage efforts, as well as a whistle stop tour of the Pacific campaign to the dropping of the atomic bomb.

I’d recommend this for anyone looking for a present day view of the attack it’s ramifications both at the time and also to the present day.

I received this book free from Netgalley and was not required to write a positive review.

Review of ” The Midnight Watch: A Novel of the Titanic and the Californian” by David Dyer

Vivid retelling of Titanic tragedy

David Dyer ‘s story is based on real events, but is an imagining of the events that occurred on nearby ship, the Californian which failed to go to the Titanic’s aid.

I resisted googling the Californian and the reading experience was all the richer for that. Dyer’s characters are real names based on the records of the official enquiries but are more detailed than a mere official document with all their flaws and fears laid bare.

The main character is fictional journalist John Steadman who is attempting to find out the truth about the Californian. By using Steadman Dyer creates a compelling narrative that brings depth and contrast to the story and characters.

A good historical fiction debut that brings a different viewpoint to a well-trodden path